Website for conflict resolution user study is now online!

We have at last finalized the website for the conflict resolution user study mentioned here, and it is online now for anyone to participate. We have also launched a campaign on Microworkers.com to add more participants. You can check it out at:

http://ii.tudelft.nl/~alexk/ConfRes

Don’t forget to watch the instructional video(s)!

Advertisements

Experiment: can human values be used as predictors for solving user-created normative conflicts?

Motivation and objective

Previously we showed that social commitment models could play an important role into making social applications more adaptive/intelligent, and better promote user values in that domain. However, social commitments are norm-based, conflicts may occur and they need to be resolved.

Many conflict resolution approaches exist in literature, but they are rather concerned with the “how” rather than the “why”, i.e. how to implement a certain conflict resolution policy, rather than what that policy contains. We are proposing that, given a user’s value profile (i.e. order and/or preference of a number of relevant values), and how that user believes certain commitment are relevant to the same set of values, that we can predict the user’s preferred solution if a conflict is to occur involving any two of these commitments. The importance of this is that, assuming we were able to predict the correct solution for a majority of conflicts, that social media platforms can use contextual data to automatically solve conflicts between privacy/newsfeed settings created by the user in the future.

Relevant values

Using Rokeach’s value survey as a basis, we select a sample of potentially relevant values. This is not meant to be comprehensive list of all values possibly involved. The interpretation of these values here is generalized, and participants may as well project their own interpretation over the ones provided.

• Safety (Rokeach: family security)
For one or members of one’s own family to be safe from dangers or harm.

• Independence/freedom
For one, or members of one’s own family to be capable of doing what they need to do on their own, without being dependent on others.

• Social recognition/friendship
For one or members of one’s own family to build true friendships, a social life, and be recognized or distinguished amongst others in their social circle.

• Privacy (not in Rokeach’s list but relevant)
For one or members of one’s own family to have important information about them only shared with those they agree to share it with.

• Responsibility
For one or members of one’s own family to act responsibly in situations where that is required.

• Peace of mind (Rokeach: inner harmony)
For one or members of one’s own family to live with few or no worries and/or disturbances.

Hypotheses/research questions

H1: users’ value profiles in addition to how they believe certain commitments relate to their values can predict/explain the preferred conflict solution.

RQ2: will users have preferences regarding conflict solutions that deviate significantly from the “no difference” point?

RQ3: Is there an association between the agreement type (i.e. its elements) and the value profile associated to it? (E.g. location and privacy)

RQ4: users will have no significant preference for one value over another in their value profile.

…to be continued.

 

Journal Article: Electronic Partners for Improved Support of User Values

Currently writing my second journal article. This article highlights that location sharing apps, especially in the family domain, need to provide a better support for a certain set of domain-related user values (e.g. family security, friendship, social recognition, and independence). The article relies primarily on the series of  user studies at the day care centers, which I wrote about earlier here, here, and here. It picks up from the results of first paper which evaluated a social commitment model’s usability and usefulness, and goes on to show that location sharing apps augmented with such a model, i.e. “electronic partners”, can provide enhanced support for user values.

Journal article: “A social commitment model for location sharing applications in the family domain”.

Just submitted a journal article titled “A social commitment model for location sharing applications in the family domain”, to the International Journal of Human Computer Studies (IJHCS). In this article I discuss the creation of the social commitment model and lifecycle (see photo below), throughout the conception phase, evaluation through CCS, then the enhancement, creation of an alternative lifecycle, and then evaluation results using SWT.

Will update this post with a preliminary version once it’s been published. If you would like a copy already, leave a comment with your email.

sc-model

Gave a talk at Social Media Week Rotterdam, 2015!

Was very glad this week to have given a talk @Social Media Week conference in Rotterdam! This event is a part of an international Social Media Week, which takes place in different cities simultaneously around the globe, on 4 different occasions every year (Rotterdam was during the same week as London, Miami, and Sao Paolo). I talked about the results of two experiments, the usability/usefulness study conducted using the crowd sourcing platform, and the app testing at the day care centers with children.

I was at the main room (zaal 1), and the talk was streamed live online and was archived as well. You can check it out below. Great experience overall, looking forward for coming back next year as well!

Simulated Work Tasks: an online study of usability and contribution of a Social Commitments model

About to run a Simulated Work Tasks (SWTs) experiment using the online platform microworkers.com. The goal of this experiment is to assess the usability and domain contribution to the social commitments (SC) model that we created. Participants will perform 4 tasks each, and at the end of each task, they will try to solve the family-life domain problem through creating an agreement using a menu representation of the SC model. After that, they will have to rate how well did the options in the SC menu contribute towards the solving the problem in the scenario, using a slider.

You can try it out yourself as well, using this link. Make sure you see the explanation video first!